Monthly Archives: January 2012

Nonprofits Added Jobs Faster Than Businesses Last Decade, Study Finds

By Noelle Barton in the Chronicle of Philanthropy on January 19, 2012

Nonprofits added jobs at an average annual rate of more than 2 percent from 2000 to 2010, while for-profit jobs were cut by 0.6 percent each year on average, according to a new study. 

Even during the recession years of 2008 and 2009, charities increased their employment by nearly 2 percent, while for-profit jobs declined by nearly 4 percent, according to the report, which was based on Bureau of Labor Statistics data.

The study, by the Center for Civil Society Studies at Johns Hopkins University, also found that nonprofits are the third largest type of private employer in the United States, behind only retail trade and manufacturing. Nonprofits employed nearly 10.7 million workers in 2010, which is just over 10 percent of the country’s work force, not counting government employees. More than half of all nonprofit employees have jobs at health-care organizations, while 15 percent work at colleges and other educational institutions.

Although nonprofit organizations added jobs at a higher rate than their for-profit counterparts in general, there were exceptions in some parts of the economy: For example, in the social services, employment grew by an average of only 2.2 percent at nonprofits but by an average of 5.4 percent at for-profits. During that period, the share of social-service jobs held at nonprofits dropped from 62 percent to 54 percent. Similar declines were seen in education and health care.

Click here to read full article and discussions…

ART IS NOT APART: A three-day symposium to reclaim the arts as an integral part of community life

Thursday 1/26 – Saturday 1/28 – Highly Recommended!

It was truly exciting to be a part of this new project last night! Artists, teachers, administrators, students, community activists all sharing, listening and working together to explore new ways of breaking down barriers and involving every community in the arts.  Thanks to Michael Roderick, Nellie Perera and Alison Fleminger for bringing this symposium to life!
Mallory King, Arts to Grow

The S.A.M. Talks are happening!

Podium
Some of you may remember this blog post about the S.A.M. Talks. 

It seems something is in the air as the first TedX Broadway event kicked off yesterday and now the S.A.M. talks will be happening this weekend. As I promised, they are free, but you do need to register. All of the info is below. If any of my readers are interested in helping out or know someone who might be interested in videotaping, please email me

Look forward to seeing all of you there!

Excelsior!

ART IS NOT APART: Experiments, Reflections and Manifestos

A three-day symposium for artists, educators, curators and community workers who seek to reclaim the arts as an integral part of community life.

Collaboratively designed and hosted by two of New York’s oldest yet most innovative community-based organizations – University Settlement and Henry Street Settlement.


ADMISSION IS FREE – REGISTER IN ADVANCE!

Please click here to submit your registration form.

You can register for all or parts of the symposium but spots are limited –

so act fast!

Detailed schedule below:

Thursday, January 26th

Friday, January 27th 

Saturday, January 28th

 

Join an array of creative community makers including…

Elastic CityFourth Arts Block (FAB NYC)Ping Chong & CompanyviBe Theater Experience,Sasha Soreff Dance TheaterCarnegie Hall’s Weill Music InstituteArts to GrowLeave Out Violence-U.S. (LOVE-US)SPACE on Ryder Farm,Patty Dukes and Reph StarThe AnthropologistsHip Hop Re:Education Project and our three Artists in Residence – Panoply Performance LabKinematik Dance Theater and Trusty Sidekick Theater Company.


SCHEDULE:

THURSDAY, JANUARY 26TH 7PM-9:30PM

Creating Possibilities: Exploring Working Models, Approaches and Techniques

Panel Discussion: In a climate where essential services for children, seniors and other vulnerable populations are struggling to survive, how are artists making art relevant and integral to community life?

Panelists include:

Fabian Farbeon Saucedo, Program director of Hip Hop Re:Education Project  
chandra thomas, Co-Founder/Director of Programming,  viBe Theater Experience
Mallory King, Founder/Executive Director, Arts to Grow
Clayton B. Evans, Executive Director of Leave Out Violence-U.S. (LOVE-US)
Sara Zatz, Associate Director of Ping Chong & Company
Ann Gregg, Director of Community Programs of Carnegie Hall’s Weill’s Music Institute

Breakout Session: Small groups facilitated by the panelists will brainstorm art and community connections and then collaboratively create a visual artifact to hang in The Gallery of Possibilities which will be on display throughout the symposium. Participants are welcome to bring artifacts from their own work.

The Shoelace Project: Created by Sasha Soreff Dance Theater. This interactive performance and workshop explores how shoelaces represent a powerful and nearly universal symbol: they tie us up, trip us up and hold us up. Personally inscribe an ultra wide shoelace with your hopes and fears and make discoveries about what gets us tangled and untangled, bound and unbound.

[TOP]


FRIDAY, JANUARY 27TH 7PM-9:30PM

Resistance (theirs…or mine?): Transforming Resistance Into Creative Fuel

Breakout Session: As we have all experienced, resistance is an inevitable component of making art. Small groups guided by expert facilitators will identify and harness the forces of resistance. Each group will devise an original performance as a means of sharing perspectives, strategies, and techniques for working with resistance.

Facilitators include:

Jesca Prudencio, Educator Coordinator of Ping Chong & Company
Esther Neff, Co-Artistic Director of Panoply Performance Lab
Jonathan Shmidt, Artistic Director of Trusty Sidekick Theater Company
Melissa F. Moschitto, Artistic Director of The Anthropologists  
Svea Schneider, Artistic Director of Kinematik Dance Theater
Patty Dukes , Artistic Director of Dreamyard’s Bronx Theater Ensemble

Artist Shares: Enjoy short performances by artists who are finding interesting ways to connect their process and work with communities traditionally beyond the reach of the art world.

Shares include:

Panoply Performance LabNATURE FETISH: Episode 1: Laws and Logic
Patty Dukes and Reph Starr: Excerpt from Free Lunch

Wine Reception: Build up your creative community network.

[TOP]


SATURDAY, JANUARY 28TH 3PM-9:30PM
(COMMUNITY DINNER AT 6PM) 

Manifesting Art and Community: Sharing and Acquiring New Skills, Ideas and Inspirations

Workshops: A selection of 90-minute workshops led by dynamic facilitators. Each participant will have the opportunity to select two hands-on workshops.

All workshops will be offered during session 1 and 2.Click here to see all the workshop descriptions!

You can now sign up for workshops when you register. If the workshop you would like to join is full, contactafleminger@universitysettlement.org to be put on the waiting list.

If you registered before January 19 you will be contacted to sign up for workshops.

Saturday Workshop Session 1:
Check-in: 2:45PM
Session: 3:00-4:15PM

Saturday Workshop Session 2:
Check-in: 4:20PM
Session: 4:30-5:45PM

Community Dinner: Sit, eat and enjoy connecting with creative community makers.

Smart Art Manifests & Artist Shares: Join us for an inspiring series of TED-style SAM (Smart Art Manifestos) talks and performances by innovative and highly creative community makers, including:

  • Russell Granet, Founder of Arts Education Resource (AER), shares his vision for the future of arts education.
  • Michael Roderick, Broadway Producer/ Founder of Small Pond Enterprises LLC, believes that hope lies in the artists- and talks about the lack of essential business education in arts programs set against the backdrop of Orwell’s 1984. 
  • Lilli WoskVocal Coach /Music Director / Entrepreneur, questions Why Arts Entrepreneurship Now? And inspires similarities between arts entrepreneurs and the owners of hedge funds and the misconceptions regarding our limits.
  • And Melanie Joseph, Artistic Producer of The Foundry Theater gives the symposium’s closing remarks.


This symposium is co-curated by Nellie Perera, Director of Arts in Education at Henry Street Settlement’s Abrons Arts Center, Alison Fleminger, Program Curator and Educator of The Performance Project @ University Settlement and Michael Roderick, Found of Small Pond Enterprises LLC.

The title ART IS NOT APART is inspired by artist and educator Eric Booth.

Remember – spots are limited. Click here to complete the registration form today.

5 Free Event to do with Kids this Weekend!

1. Creative Corner 

A creative outlet for children ages 6-13 to express themselves through art.

Repeats every week every Saturday until Sat Feb 25 2012 

Sat, 2012-01-07 10:30 – 13:30

Jackie Robinson Recreation Center 85 Bradhurst Avenue, New York 

FREE

2. Book Club

Takes place every Saturday. Members receive a Book Club Passport at their first story time, and a gift after attending 5 story times.

 Repeats every week until Sat Mar 31 2012 .

Sat, 2012-01-14 10:00

Pottery Barn Kids 1311 Second Avenue , New York NY 10065

FREE

Please note, a call to this store location confirmed the event takes place on a different day and time than what is stated on the website.

3Free Trial Classes 

Join us for a free trial class the week of January 22 through January 28th!!! Choose from our class schedule on our website. Reservations are required.

Repeats every day until Sat Jan 28 2012 .

Sun, 2012-01-22 10:00 – 13:00

Long Island City School of Ballet 44-02 23rd Street Studio 216, LIC NY 11101

Free

4. Tour of Greenpeace’s Newest Ship, The Rainbow Warrior III

Come Visit Greenpeace’s Ship: The New Rainbow Warrior @ Chelsea Piers, Pier 59 Free Public Tours Sat. 1/28 & Sun. 1/29 10am-6pm

Repeats every day until Sun Jan 29 2012 

Sat, 2012-01-28 09:00 – 17:00

Chelsea Piers New York NY

FREE

5. SMB’s Fashion Design  Class Open House  


Please join us and learn about the fashion design skills that will be taught during the sessions, visit our amazing Fashion Design Technology classroom, and view the finished portfolio and Dirndle Skirt that you will construct.See you there!!!Sat, 2012-01-28 11:00

High School of Fashion Industries 225 West 24th street, New York NY 10011

FREE

ART IS NOT APART: A three-day symposium to reclaim the arts as an integral part of community life.

Thursday 1/26 – Saturday 1/28 – Highly Recommended!

It was truly exciting to be a part of this new project last night! Artists, teachers, administrators, students, community activists all sharing, listening and working together to explore new ways of breaking down barriers and involving every community in the arts.  Thanks to Michael Roderick, Nellie Perera and Alison Fleminger for bringing this symposium to life!
Mallory King, Arts to Grow

The S.A.M. Talks are happening!

Podium
Some of you may remember this blog post about the S.A.M. Talks. 

It seems something is in the air as the first TedX Broadway event kicked off yesterday and now the S.A.M. talks will be happening this weekend. As I promised, they are free, but you do need to register. All of the info is below. If any of my readers are interested in helping out or know someone who might be interested in videotaping, please email me

Look forward to seeing all of you there!

Excelsior!

ART IS NOT APART: Experiments, Reflections and Manifestos

A three-day symposium for artists, educators, curators and community workers who seek to reclaim the arts as an integral part of community life.

Collaboratively designed and hosted by two of New York’s oldest yet most innovative community-based organizations – University Settlement and Henry Street Settlement.


ADMISSION IS FREE – REGISTER IN ADVANCE!

Please click here to submit your registration form.

You can register for all or parts of the symposium but spots are limited –

so act fast!

Detailed schedule below:

Thursday, January 26th

Friday, January 27th 

Saturday, January 28th

 

Join an array of creative community makers including…

Elastic CityFourth Arts Block (FAB NYC)Ping Chong & CompanyviBe Theater Experience,Sasha Soreff Dance TheaterCarnegie Hall’s Weill Music InstituteArts to GrowLeave Out Violence-U.S. (LOVE-US)SPACE on Ryder Farm,Patty Dukes and Reph StarThe AnthropologistsHip Hop Re:Education Project and our three Artists in Residence – Panoply Performance LabKinematik Dance Theater and Trusty Sidekick Theater Company.


SCHEDULE:

THURSDAY, JANUARY 26TH 7PM-9:30PM

Creating Possibilities: Exploring Working Models, Approaches and Techniques

Panel Discussion: In a climate where essential services for children, seniors and other vulnerable populations are struggling to survive, how are artists making art relevant and integral to community life?

Panelists include:

Fabian Farbeon Saucedo, Program director of Hip Hop Re:Education Project  
chandra thomas, Co-Founder/Director of Programming,  viBe Theater Experience
Mallory King, Founder/Executive Director, Arts to Grow
Clayton B. Evans, Executive Director of Leave Out Violence-U.S. (LOVE-US)
Sara Zatz, Associate Director of Ping Chong & Company
Ann Gregg, Director of Community Programs of Carnegie Hall’s Weill’s Music Institute

Breakout Session: Small groups facilitated by the panelists will brainstorm art and community connections and then collaboratively create a visual artifact to hang in The Gallery of Possibilities which will be on display throughout the symposium. Participants are welcome to bring artifacts from their own work.

The Shoelace Project: Created by Sasha Soreff Dance Theater. This interactive performance and workshop explores how shoelaces represent a powerful and nearly universal symbol: they tie us up, trip us up and hold us up. Personally inscribe an ultra wide shoelace with your hopes and fears and make discoveries about what gets us tangled and untangled, bound and unbound.

[TOP]


FRIDAY, JANUARY 27TH 7PM-9:30PM

Resistance (theirs…or mine?): Transforming Resistance Into Creative Fuel

Breakout Session: As we have all experienced, resistance is an inevitable component of making art. Small groups guided by expert facilitators will identify and harness the forces of resistance. Each group will devise an original performance as a means of sharing perspectives, strategies, and techniques for working with resistance.

Facilitators include:

Jesca Prudencio, Educator Coordinator of Ping Chong & Company
Esther Neff, Co-Artistic Director of Panoply Performance Lab
Jonathan Shmidt, Artistic Director of Trusty Sidekick Theater Company
Melissa F. Moschitto, Artistic Director of The Anthropologists  
Svea Schneider, Artistic Director of Kinematik Dance Theater
Patty Dukes , Artistic Director of Dreamyard’s Bronx Theater Ensemble

Artist Shares: Enjoy short performances by artists who are finding interesting ways to connect their process and work with communities traditionally beyond the reach of the art world.

Shares include:

Panoply Performance LabNATURE FETISH: Episode 1: Laws and Logic
Patty Dukes and Reph Starr: Excerpt from Free Lunch

Wine Reception: Build up your creative community network.

[TOP]


SATURDAY, JANUARY 28TH 3PM-9:30PM
(COMMUNITY DINNER AT 6PM) 

Manifesting Art and Community: Sharing and Acquiring New Skills, Ideas and Inspirations

Workshops: A selection of 90-minute workshops led by dynamic facilitators. Each participant will have the opportunity to select two hands-on workshops.

All workshops will be offered during session 1 and 2.Click here to see all the workshop descriptions!

You can now sign up for workshops when you register. If the workshop you would like to join is full, contactafleminger@universitysettlement.org to be put on the waiting list.

If you registered before January 19 you will be contacted to sign up for workshops.

Saturday Workshop Session 1:
Check-in: 2:45PM
Session: 3:00-4:15PM

Saturday Workshop Session 2:
Check-in: 4:20PM
Session: 4:30-5:45PM

Community Dinner: Sit, eat and enjoy connecting with creative community makers.

Smart Art Manifests & Artist Shares: Join us for an inspiring series of TED-style SAM (Smart Art Manifestos) talks and performances by innovative and highly creative community makers, including:

  • Russell Granet, Founder of Arts Education Resource (AER), shares his vision for the future of arts education.
  • Michael Roderick, Broadway Producer/ Founder of Small Pond Enterprises LLC, believes that hope lies in the artists- and talks about the lack of essential business education in arts programs set against the backdrop of Orwell’s 1984. 
  • Lilli WoskVocal Coach /Music Director / Entrepreneur, questions Why Arts Entrepreneurship Now? And inspires similarities between arts entrepreneurs and the owners of hedge funds and the misconceptions regarding our limits.
  • And Melanie Joseph, Artistic Producer of The Foundry Theater gives the symposium’s closing remarks.


This symposium is co-curated by Nellie Perera, Director of Arts in Education at Henry Street Settlement’s Abrons Arts Center, Alison Fleminger, Program Curator and Educator of The Performance Project @ University Settlement and Michael Roderick, Found of Small Pond Enterprises LLC.

The title ART IS NOT APART is inspired by artist and educator Eric Booth.

Remember – spots are limited. Click here to complete the registration form today.

Three Strategies for Using the Arts to Build Student Executive Functions

In online magazine Edutopia, we happened to come across a blog post by JUDY WILLIS MD, which we find very inspiring for Teaching Artists, Teachers and Students. 

Before information can be processed through executive functions, it must reach the prefrontal cortex (PFC), where higher order thinking occurs. The pathway to the PFC has potential roadblocks in the form of an information intake filter and an emotional switching station that determines if input reaches the PFC or is diverted to the lower, reactive brain. Embedding the arts into instruction and assessment promotes flow through these filters, builds growth mindset, and strengthens the actively developing executive functions.

1) The Arts Get Past the Brain’s Attention Filter to Promote and Sustain Attention

All learning enters the brain as sensory input, but not all sensory input is allowed in through the brain’s attention filter. The brain admits only about one percent of the sensory input available to it each second. It therefore behooves teachers to be sure their instruction “makes the cut.”

This involuntary filter is in the low brainstem, and is called the reticular activating system (RAS). It gives priority to novel, unusual, curious sensory information. Listening to lectures and doing drills and worksheets are not novel or curiosity-evoking sensory experiences. That said, you can still snag students’ attention by incorporating the types of sensory input that is favored for RAS selection. Here are ways you can incorporate some of the stimuli that get priority admission to the brain:

  • Use color
  • Use movement (through your own actions and with students)
  • Incorporate music
  • Incorporate changes in your voice
  • Include curious objects
  • Create positive anticipation of an activity that has previously been associated with pleasure

Strategy 1 in the Classroom

You’ve seen professional speakers engage an audience by starting off with humor or a question that promotes curiosity. Starting a lesson with something to immediately engage students is equally important. You can promote attentive intake with curious or compelling photographs, drawings, music, video clips of scenes of from theatrical productions, or by reading a book using different voices for different characters. Once the intake filter opens to your novel, unusual or curious sensory information, it is likely that the academic information following andrelating to these openings will be “selected” by this involuntary attention filter.

Click here to read full blog post…

The Global Search for Education: A Look at New York Public Schools

C.M. Rubin of the Huffington Post with Eric Nadelstern on 1/17/12 

Mr. Nadelstern is a Bronx native and graduate of DeWitt Clinton High School, having worked in New York City public schools for 39 years and rising to the position of  Deputy Chancellor for the Division of School Support and Instruction in 2010. Following his retirement from the system last year, he is currently Professor of Practice in Education Leadership at Teachers College, Columbia University.

What are the problems we face in the New York City public school system?

We are spending $23 billion of the public’s hard earned money in New York City every year to support the country’s largest school district, and yet 35 percent of the students are not graduating from high school. The good news is just a few years ago it was half the students, and things had been frozen at that rate for the prior 50 years. Still, 35 percent are not graduating and the 35 percent who aren’t are largely male, African American and Latino. This is significant evidence that despite everything we are doing, we haven’t been able to close the achievement gap in the city.

What I think differentiates New York from some other countries in the world that I have visited or am familiar with is that we recognize there is an achievement gap. This contrasts with Israel which runs five separate and unequal school systems. Their primary concern, as in many other places, is to produce the few outstanding mathematicians and scientists who can compete with other countries, compared to thinking about educating the entire population to their highest potential.

click here to read full article …

THANKS TO JORDAN GRUBB: Winter Formal Raised $2,000 for Arts to Grow

On December 11, 2011, Broadway actor Jordan Grubb held his 7th Annual Winter Formal atThe Irish Rogue, raising funds for Arts to Grow. Jordan has just joined the National Touring Company of Mary Poppins. The event was attended by members of the New York theatre community. This is the second year that Jordan has partnered with our organization and this year was an even greater success than last. 

Through a Chinese raffle of donated services and the generous donations of party guests, Jordan’s event was able to raise $2,010. Arts to Grow would especially like to thank Thor Equities for their generous contribution.

Arts to Grow founder and executive director, Mallory King, attended the event and was graciously welcomed by the guests. Mallory and the entire Arts to Grow community are grateful for the generosity of Jordan and his guests and look forward to working with him in the future.

Merry Formal 2011!

Photos courtesy of Jordan Grubb